Sayidangwa Kunafonin

Sayidangwa Kunafonin

English Translation of Page 1

• If you choose to care for an ill person in your home, notify public health officials of your
intentions so they can train you and provide appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
(gloves, impermeable gown, boots/closed shoes with overshoes, mask and eye protection for
splashes), as well as instructions as a reminder on how to properly care for the patient, protect
yourself and your family, and properly dispose of the PPE after use. N.B. WHO does not
recommend home care and strongly advises individuals and their family members to seek
professional care in a treatment centre.
• When visiting patients in the hospital or caring for someone at home, hand washing with soap
and water is recommended after touching a patient, being in contact with their bodily fluids, or
touching his/her surroundings.
• People who have died from Ebola should only be handled using appropriate protective
equipment and should be buried immediately by public health professionals who are trained in
safe burial procedures.
Additionally, individuals should reduce contact with high‐risk infected animals (i.e. fruit bats,
monkeys, or apes) in the affected rainforest areas. If you suspect an animal is infected, do not
handle it. Animal products (blood and meat) should be thoroughly cooked before eating.
8. What about health workers? How should they protect themselves while caring for
patients?
Health workers treating patients with suspected or confirmed illness are at higher risk of infection
than other groups. During an outbreak a number of important actions will reduce or stop the spread
of the virus and protect health workers and others in the health‐care setting. These actions are
called “standard and other additional precautions” and are evidence‐based recommendationsknown to prevent the spread of infections. The following questions and answers describe the
precautions in detail.
Should patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus be separated from other patients?
Isolating patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus disease in single isolation rooms is
recommended. Where isolation rooms are not available, it is important to assign designated areas,
separate from other patients, for suspected and confirmed cases. In these designated areas, suspect
and confirmed cases should also be separate. Access to these areas should be restricted, needed
equipment should be dedicated strictly to suspected and confirmed EVD treatment areas, and
clinical and non‐clinical personnel should be exclusively assigned to isolation rooms and dedicated
areas.

African Language Program at Harvard University